Call Me By Your Name: Movie Man Jackson

Nothing is as sweet as a peach, or your first love. The summer of 1983 brings Elio Perlman (Timothée Chalamet) something he’s never felt before. Seventeen-year-old Elio lives in Italy with his parents, spending the days immersing himself into classical music. Each summer brings a different person into Elio’s home, because his father, Professor Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg) works as a professor and needs the help during the period to prep and research. The youngster has grown to accept this, even if it means giving up his room consistently.

But this summer is different. Twenty-four year-old Oliver (Armie Hammer) is the scholar this year, and a magnetism quickly draws Elio to him. And it doesn’t happen overnight, but it is a thing—a spark—that keeps on building and building, whether at the meal table, out for a swim, or biking along the countryside. Six weeks is a short amount of time, but in ways, it’s a lifetime.

Seeing Italy as the setting for a romance is nothing new. Outside of Paris, France, it’s pretty much the country of love. After viewing Call Me By Your Name, however, no romance has tapped into its environment more than director Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love, A Bigger Splash). The environment, as much as the masterful acting work, cements Call Me By Your Name as a requisite watch for not only romance lovers, but any film nuts.

For as great as the acting work is, Call Me By Your Name will be remembered for the locale. Filmed on location, there’s an immense level of warmth felt from the get-go and the opening titles. It’s natural and inviting; one can damn near feel the morning sun and the nighttime breeze in every respective scene. Alluring is the word, and Guadagnino’s intentionally distanced direction, along with a beautiful score and soundtrack by Sufjan Stevens, makes his film stand as an impressive production.

 

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of Call Me By Your Name is how methodically patient it plays out. Sure, at times it can be a little too slowly paced with nothing of real importance occurring, but nonetheless, unique to see a romance unfurl with the speed of a tortoise and still be compelling. And the unfurling occurs without real conflict. While it would have been nice to see some significant impediments to the budding union and some more meat on these character, this is not how the novel was written by author André Aciman. Not only is it cool to see a mostly intended vision (by most accounts) upheld, there’s a simple yet nice message that love can sort of exist separately as its own entity. Narrative-wise, this isn’t a groundbreaking romantic story, but it is still well-told.

What is groundbreaking happens to be the lead performance of Timothée Chalamet. He dives into the part with so much assuredness. His part is obviously not easy, not only due to the occasional explicitness, but for how he’s got to portray emotion while not being outwardly emotive. Not much more can be said about his work that hasn’t already been said. Not the forgotten-but-still-second-fiddle is Armie Hammer, equal parts mysterious, charismatic, and quirky. On their own, the work would still be great but probably a little empty.

Together, it’s electric seeing the opposite personalities recognize their key differences but being totally unable to stay away from one another. This is very much a two person movie, three if the setting is included (and it should be), though Michael Stuhlbarg, continuing his torrid streak of buzzworthy movies since 2015, chews some scenery and absolutely is in possession of the feature’s most emotionally resonant moment.

More than enough for technical aficionados or those who just love their romantic movies, Call Me By Your Name is a sweet and succulent viewing. Bite in.

B

Photo credits go to filmschoolrejects.com, hollywoodreporter.com, cinemavine.com, and joblo.com.

For additional detailed thoughts on films both small and large, games, and the key moments that comprise each, check out ThatMomentIn.com

Follow the Movie Man @MovieManJackson

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Lady Bird: Movie Man Jackson

Lady Bird, sounds like a classic 1950’s jazz album. Spoiler: It’s not, but it is the nickname that Sacramento high school senior Christine McPherson (Saoirse Ronan) wishes to go by. She’s the artistic, headstrong, and independent type. Her personality often gets her into clashes with her mother, Marion (Laurie Metcalf), who only wants Christine to be the “best version of herself.”

Lady Bird wishes to go out to New York for college despite the financial struggles her family is experiencing, as she is convinced she needs to get away from sleepy Sacramento to thrive. Before it’s time to fly, she’ll find out that there are many, many more lessons for her to learn before leaving the California roost.

From Spider Man: Homecoming to Dope to Brooklyn to The Edge of Seventeen, the last few years have shown that there is always room for a well-told coming-of-age movie regardless of setting or even main genre. The latest in the subgenre comes from Greta Gerwig, known mainly for acting more so than directing at this point. In her first full directorial credit, she’s steered Lady Bird to 195 fresh reviews on Rotten Tomatoes as of this writing. If yours truly’s post were factored into it, I certainly wouldn’t break the streak. Lady Bird is deserving of its praise.

Lady Bird doesn’t breathe completely new life into the coming-of-age genre, but no movie really does in this subgenre. Still, it’s an extremely authentic and rooted portrait of growing up, seemingly inspired by Gerwig and her experiences growing up in Sacramento; the extent of what actually occurred and didn’t is a mystery. Doesn’t matter though, because, Gerwig’s writing is so honest and natural. Everything from the dialogue (possibly the most important thing in a coming-of-age: do the kids sound like kids?) to the traversing of high school and the many mines that are present each day. Gerwig imbues this familiar story with quirkiness and humor emphasized by the opening music by composer Jon Brion, but never forgets the heart, also punctuated by two beautiful end tracks.

Lady Bird isn’t a film one would necessarily think would be cinematic, but boy, it certainly is. The sleepiness and tucked away vibe of Sacramento, California serves as a perfect backdrop for this drama shot on location. Who knew that 2002 had such nostalgia and a real aesthetic to it? Going far beyond the timely Justin Timberlake “Cry Me a River” and other fitting musical songs (some were released around 2002 but all fit the style of the film) and fashion styles, the world Gerwig creates is very memory-evoking. Immersion may not be the right word, but Greta makes the viewer feel like they’re a fly on the wall watching all of this unfurl with the small but noticeable details.

Most teenagers are hard to get, bold one moment, afraid the next. Gerwing’s writing is great for her two lead characters, and her stars take advantage of it. No longer an up-and-comer, Saorise Ronan is simply one of the best thespians today. With Lady Bird, she’s allowed to be a lot more dynamic and proactive than, say, Brooklyn, another great movie and role albeit more reactive. Sometimes you love her for wanting to be so independent, sometimes you hate her for being so selfish.

But it’s always realistic, as is the mother of Lady Bird played by Roseanne alum Laurie Metcalf. Like Christine, Marion is far from a perfect individual, but one can see where she’s coming from. The clashing of mother-daughter is compelling and uncomfortable in a way not seen in a long time in cinema, and both should be on the short list for every major award circuit. Not to be forgotten are castmates Lucas Hedges, Beanie Feldstein, Timothée Chalamet, Odeya Rush, and especially, Tracy Letts as the father on hard career luck having an equally hard time serving as the glue that holds the household together. His actual screentime may not be enough for serious consideration, but nonetheless, his time on the screen is moving.

As we fully descend into awards season with the recent announcement of the Golden Globes, Lady Bird certainly has a presence with four nominations. Safe bet that the rest of this season will find Lady Bird perched somewhere near the top.

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Photo credits go to npr.org, HD-Trailers.net, Youtube.com, and glamour.com.

For additional detailed thoughts on films both small and large, games, and the key moments that comprise each, check out ThatMomentIn.com

Follow the Movie Man @MovieManJackson